Today in Legal Artificial Intelligence

By Mark T Greene July 30, 2018
  • Check out this discussion on LinkedIn of Ron Friedmann’s postCan Law Firms Gain a Sustainable Advantage with AI? Several luminaries weigh in. (I maintain that AI has reached, or will soon reach, the point of being a class of universally available resources, akin to utilities. At that point, AI will not inherently deliver a competitive advantage any more than will electricity. The competitive advantage will come from what you do with it.)

 

  • This in-depth story from NBC is a good summary of where we stand with AI facial recognition. By one account, it’s about 95% accurate, but the errors skew toward minorities. “Great promise — and great peril.” According to a representative of the Oakland Police Department, “Until we identify an incredible benefit for facial recognition, the cost is just too high.”

 

  • This 20-minute podcast from Law Pod UK discusses “a world in which legal decisions are no longer made by humans.” Ep. 40: How AI and algorithms impact on regulation and adjudication. It features Law and Political Science Professor Cary Coglianese from the University of Pennsylvania, and David Lehr, a research affiliate at the Penn Program on Regulation and a student at Yale Law School. The examples of current AI-based adjudication in the private sector are interesting. One of the speakers suggests that use of AI may be inconsistent with Lincoln’s government “of the people, for the people and by the people.”

 

  • From Healthcare FinanceWhat healthcare CFOs should know about artificial intelligence, machine learning and chatbots. “Artificial intelligence is coming to healthcare. In fact, it’s already here, and physicians are benefiting from it, using it to streamline administrative functions and enhance the patient experience.”

 

  • From Crowell & Moring’s Fastest 5 Minutes, The Podcast Gov’t Contractors Can’t Do Without (July 27), (it’s actually 8+ minutes), this episode touches on the DoD’s establishment of the “Joint Artificial Intelligence Center”, also called the “AI Command (AIC)”, to “accelerate the delivery of AI capabilities, scale the DoD impact of AI and synchronize DoD activities to expand joint force advantages.” There’s quite a bit more here.